Authors Posts by Nils Olson

Nils Olson

80 POSTS 1 COMMENTS
Nils Olson is a missionary pastor who works at Munakata Bethel Christian Center (Japan). Attended Bethel Temple Bible School in Seattle WA. Has resided in Munakata City, JAPAN for almost 40 years. Nils has authored the book, "My Chapter of the Story," a lifetime collection of stories and anecdotes.

by -

A couple of thoughts . . .

I’m reading Jay Zinn’s Countdown to Eternity again, and boy, with all he writes describing the events leading up to the tribulation, I’m wondering if I’ll make it. We just need more of the Holy Ghost, it’s that simple. I long for and wait for the day when Almighty God said He will pour out of His Spirit upon ALL flesh, the good and the bad.

I feel so sorry for our President, too, and find myself praying for him often. The press is really out to get him. The newscasters are not reporting news at all. They use their inflected voices, and all kinds of body language to strongly editorialize the news, and their own opinion, to sway people to their own networks’ opinions. Real news should only include the five Ws — who, what, when, where, and why.

When I was majoring in TV and radio news many years ago, we would have lost our broadcast licenses if we were to do and speak the way present-day newscasters do. Plus, anonymity was never allowed. Anonymous people were and are unqualified sources of information. Back then, unless we identified at least the actual source’s name, it was not allowed to be aired. I wonder where in the world these days can we see and hear the real news?

I suppose I should just quit watching the news, but then again, being informed of what’s happening is important. If I completely remove myself from what is happening and become so spiritually minded, I’ll become no earthly good.

We need a balanced life. 

–nils

by -

A doxology (Ancient Greek: δοξολογία doxologia, from δόξα, doxa, “glory” and -λογία, -logia, “saying”) is a short hymn of praises to God in various forms of Christian worship, often added to the end of canticles, psalms, and hymns. What is know as “the doxology” is almost always sung at the end of a worship service.

The doxology below was written by Fintan O’Carrol and Christopher Walker and is taken from the Japan Episcopal Hymnal No. 579. It is sung by Sachiko Koyakumaru, singing melody, and Saori Hotta who sings the harmony. It is simply two words, words that are the same in every language spoken on earth ⏤ HALLELUJAH, Amen ⏤ and it brings great glory to God in the end.

by -

I would like to introduce guest writer Karl Dahlfred, a missionary serving in Thailand. He writes about what we missionaries probably all feel when it comes to serving in a foreign country away from our homeland. ⏤nils

When a new missionary first gets to the mission field, it is obvious where home is. It is that place where you just left. It is the place where you grew up, went to school, got an education, discovered a church family, and formed your most important relationships. 

But when you live overseas long enough, a strange transition takes place.

Your “home” country doesn’t quite feel like home anymore. When you “go home”, some of the same people and places are there, but life has moved on in your absence. When you show up for the so-called “home assignment” or “furlough,” you can not just pick up where you left off. You are a visitor. An outsider. A guest without a permanent role.  Your close friends have made new close friends. Half the people in your home church only know you as a line item on a list of prayer requests.  Some new technology, slang, or cultural trend has become commonplace… expect for you because you missed it when it first came out.

On the mission field, you said things like, “Back in my count . . . ” but few local people in your host country could relate to your story. They listened politely but you knew they didn’t really understand. But that’s okay. You comfort yourself with the thought, “People back home would understand me.”

But strangely enough, those people back home who were sure to understand . . . well, they don’t.  Now that you are home, you are full of experiences and stories from the place that has become your second home. You say things like, “Back in my host country . . . ” But, of course, whatever story you tell them about your host country is hard to relate to. The things that you really miss about your host country receive a blank stare, or a “That’s weird.” After your quaint tale is done, people go back to talking about the local sports team, the latest in national politics, or something else that you haven’t given much thought to in the past few years. It is not that they don’t like you.  They do. They are glad you are finally “home.” But those “back home” people simply can not relate to your experiences “out there” in that country with the funny name whose people have even funnier (and unpronounceable) names.

On “home assignment”, people say to you, “Isn’t it great to be home!” and you think, “Yeah, kind of.” Now that you’ve had a few of your favorite foods and seen a few old friends, there are fewer reasons to stay “home.” You start to miss all those things about your host country that you came to love. Certain foods, local friends, the ministry role that you were happily engaged in. 

Home is no longer home. And sadly, that other place on the mission field will never truly be home either. Home is both places, and neither place, at the same time.                                                                             

When at “home”, the missionary dreams about their host country. When in their host country, the missionary dreams about their home country.

Missionaries are forever caught between two worlds. They can no longer completely identify with the people whom they left behind in the home country. But they can never truly identify with the people in their host country.

Home is everywhere. Home is nowhere.

But that’s okay. There have been other travelers on this road.

“These all died in faith, not having received the things promised, but having seen them and greeted them from afar, and having acknowledged that they were strangers and exiles on the earth. For people who speak thus make it clear that they are seeking a homeland. If they had been thinking of that land from which they had gone out, they would have had an opportunity to return. But as it is, they desire a better country, that is, a heavenly one. Therefore God is not ashamed to be called their God, for he has prepared for them a city.” Hebrews 11:13-16

While here on earth, we will always feel a bit unsettled and out of place. Missionaries and those of us living away from the place we grew up might experience that more than others. But someday, all those who trust in the Lord Jesus Christ will finally be home again.

Source: http://www.dahlfred.com/index.php/blogs/gleanings-from-the-field/747-why-missionaries-can-never-go-home-againSee also bio information at: http://www.dahlfred.com/index.php/about-us/bio

by -

The above headline is that of the beginning of a famous song. Many of us can sing it by heart, it was that well-known. Written by Jackie DeShannon, the lyrics suggest all we need is love to solve the world’s problems.

Click here and listen to the song sung as you read the lyrics below.

What the world needs now is love, sweet love
It’s the only thing that there’s just too little of
What the world needs now is love, sweet love
No, not just for some but for everyone

Lord, we don’t need another mountain
There are mountains and hillsides enough to climb
There are oceans and rivers enough to cross
Enough to last ’till the end of time

What the world needs now is love, sweet love
It’s the only thing that there’s just too little of
What the world needs now is love, sweet love
No, not just for some but for everyone

Lord, we don’t need another meadow
There are cornfields and wheat fields enough to grow
There are sunbeams and moonbeams enough to shine
Oh, listen, lord, if you want to know

What the world needs now is love, sweet love
It’s the only thing that there’s just too little of
What the world needs now is love, sweet love
No, not just for some, oh, but just for ever, every, everyone

What the world needs now is love, sweet love (oh, is love)
What the world needs now is love, sweet love (oh, is love)
What the world needs now is love, sweet love (oh, is love)

A few of the comments made concerning this classic song include:

“I had a hippy first grade teacher who used to play this song to us on the class record player.” — willyswear

“No truer words were ever so beautifully sung. I wish this song was a hymn in the church meeting I sometimes attend.” —Jonathan Leff

“There is so much truth to this song. This is such a filthy . . . violent world! Absolutely love this song.” —Shawn McCulley

It is written, “ . . . God is love; and he that dwells in love dwells in God, and God in him.”

Putting this expression into a super easy-to-understand meaning, love is a person, not a concept or some mystical theological idea. Love is the person of God. God came into our world to live among us and to show us His love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, meekness, reasonableness, and faithfulness. He lived among us for over 30 years, and records of His deeds among us are historically recorded. He gave us a great gift before He left and returned home. The great gift is described as the promise of “eternal life” after each one of us physically dies.

It is written, “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son (Jesus the Christ, the answer, the solution to ALL of our world problems), that whosoever believes in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved.”

The world has rejected Love’s solution to world peace. What is that solution? It is simply believing in our hearts that God raised Jesus from the dead, and confessing with our mouths Jesus Christ as Lord, master, of our hearts. Believing and confessing. If you ask me, that’s a pretty simple solution. What the world needs now is God’s love.

The whole wide world is having a heart attack! Yes, the whole wide world needs “open (the) heart” surgery NOW. It needs more than a quadruple bypass. The hearts of men are clogged with bitterness, jealously, greed, lust, pride, self-centeredness, deceit, ambiguity, false accusations, disobedience, blasphemy, covetousness and unthankfulness.

The good news is there is a good doctor! He’s a pro, bar none the best . . . his name is  Jesus. The scalpel He uses is “alive and active; it’s powerful and sharp; it cuts all the way through to where the soul and spirit of man meets; it judges the desires and thoughts of man’s heart.” The scalpel is the Word of God.

The solution to finding world peace anytime soon will have to begin with “open (the) heart” surgery . . . your heart first. Yours is the most important heart in the whole world. The word “believe in your heart that God raised Jesus from the dead and confess with your mouth Jesus as the Lord, Master of your heart” is the scalpel. God’s  anesthesia of His LOVE is already covering you, preparing you for this “open (the) heart” surgery. And afterward, you’ll have a wonderful bandaid to show the world you came through the surgery successfully.

(Note: Japanese character is that of a “heart.”)

by -

Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience the race that is set before us, Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith . . . Hebrews 12:1

Please sit back and watch 6:47 minutes of the day of “Passing The Baton at MBCC” service-celebration of photos by professional photographer Riz Crescini. Even though this slide-movie presentation is a past event, it will bring the memories of November 13, 2016 alive over and over again.